Adoption and Adoptive Families: A Bibliography

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National Organizations Offering Information and Support to Adoptive Families and Prospective Adopters
Adoption Council of Canada, P.O. Box 8442, Station T, Ottawa, Ontario K1G 3H8. Phone 613-235-1566. This network collects and disseminates information about adoption throughout Canada, facilitating communication among groups and individuals interested in adoption and promoting understanding of the
benefits and challenges of adoption.

American Academy of Adoption Attorneys, P.O. Box 33053, Washington DC 20033-0053. A national association of attorneys who handle adoption cases or otherwise have distinguished themselves in the field of adoption law. The group's work includes promoting the reform of adoption lawas and disseminating information on ethical adoption practices. The Academy publishes a newsletter and holds annual meetings and continuing education seminars for attorneys.

ATTACh, Association for Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children, Post Office Box 11347, Columbia, SC 29211, telephone 866-453-822, www.attach.org.) This national organization publishes a newsletter, has a code of conduct for its members who are mental health providers, has listings of attachment centers and therapists, and has a superb yearly national conference. They post training events on their web site

Infertility Awareness Association of Canada,(406- One Nicholas St, Ottawa,ON K1N7B7, CANADA, telephone 613-244-7222, e-mail: iaac@fox.nstn.ca). A Canadian charitable organization offering assistance, support, and education to those with infertility concerns by issuance of its bilingual publication Infertility Awareness five times a year; establishment of chapters to provide grass roots services; a resource centre; information packages; and a network of related services. Services are bilingual (English and French.) A complimentary information kit will be sent to interested Canadians upon request.

National Council for Adoption, 1930 17th St NW, Washington DC 20009, telephone 202-328-1200. An advocacy organization promoting adoption as a positive family building option. Primarily supported by member agencies, it does also encourage individual memberships from those families who share its conservative stance on open-records/confidentiality and its wary view of open placements. If you have decided to pursue a traditional, confidential, agency adoption, call NCFA for a referral to a member agency.

North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC), 970 Raymond Ave. #106, St Paul, MN 55114-1149. Phone 612-644-3036, www.nacac.org. An advocacy and education resource concerning waiting children, NACAC publishes the periodic newsletter Adoptalk, which reviews new books and tapes, and sponsors each August an enormous, well respected conference on special needs adoption for professionals and parent advocates. This conference rotates through five geographic areas. If you are considering a special needs adoption, call NACAC first for information about local and national resources, parent groups, and adoption exchanges.

Parent Network for the Post Institutionalized Child (PNPIC) PO Box 613,Meadow Land PA 15347. A support and advocacy group for those who have adopted children from orphanages and other institutional settings, PNPIC publishes a quarter newsletter called the Post at a subsription rate of $20 annually.

RESOLVE, Inc., 1310 Broadway, Somerville, MA 02144. Phone 617-623-0744. RESOLVE and its over 50 local chapters maintain current references on all infertility and adoption issues. In addition to publishing both national and local newsletters which print book reviews, the national office develops and keeps updated fact sheets on a variety of issues of interest to its membership. Several of these deal carefully with adoption subjects. Locally, chapters periodically offer, in addition to monthly meetings, day long seminars on both infertility and adoption issues. Several chapters periodically survey their geographic service area's adoption agencies and publish a resource guide.

von Ende Communications, von Ende Communications, 48220 290th St., Morris, MN 56267. (320) 589-1092. Our e:mail address is vonende@info-link.net. . This audio service catalogs the sessions from numerous large national and regional adoption and child welfare conferences. An excellent source for up-to-date information from the trainers who have not written consumer books and for narrowly focused subject information for those who do not have the opportunity to attend large conferences

NOTE: Yes, we realize that Adoptive Families of America is missing from the above list. That's because this venerable (30 year old) not for profit announced in January, 2000 that it was closing down. Their excellent magazine was sold to a for-profit publisher and continues. See below.

Books/Videos: The Politics of Adoption
Adoption Factbook: U.S Data, Issues, Regulations and Resources by staff of the National Committee for Adoption (Washington: NCFA, 1989) Since the federal government does not maintain systematic statistical data on adoption and related issues, this second version is the best source book for data.

The Encyclopedia of Adoption by Christine Adamec and William Pierce (New York: Facts on File, 1991). The title tells you exactly what this is--a collections of essays on nearly every adoption related topic you could imagine, arranged in alphabetical order. Includes hundreds of references to books, articles, studies, etc.

Family Bonds: Adoption and the Politics of Parenting by Elizabeth Bartholet (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1993.) A provocative look at how and why genetic connection is promoted to (in the author's view) the detriment of infertility patients and adoptive relationships stigmatized except when they are quasi or partial adoptions. A powerful argument for revamping the system and society's view of adoption.

The Psychology of Adoption edited by David Brodzinsky and Marshall Schechter (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990). A collection of essays on a variety of adoption issues--many written by trainers who have not written books and up to now have been difficult for consumers to access.

Chosen Children: New Patterns of Adoptive Relationships by William Feigelman and Arnold R. Silverman (New York: Praeger Publishers, 1983). A report of a large across the spectrum study (traditional and preferential adopters, domestic and international placements, inracial and transracial, infant and older child, etc.) which attempts to draw inferences about what factors predict positive and negative outcomes.

Shared Fate: A Theory and Method of Adoptive Relationships by H. David Kirk (Brentwood Bay, BC: Ben-Simon Publications, rev 1984). The presentation of the sociological theory that adoption-built families share role handicaps that can become positive tools for establishing strong, trusting family relationships.

Books/Videos: General Adoption Preparation and Readiness Issues
Being Adopted: The Lifelong Search for Self by David Brodzinsky and Marshall Schechter (New York: Doubleday, 1992). Integrating both psychological and educational theory, the authors offer a model of normal development in adoptees.

Our Child: Preparation for Parenting in Adoption--Instructor's Guide by Carol Hallenbeck, R.n. (Wayne, PA: Our Child Press, rev 1989) is a fully scripted and wonderfully resourced curriculum guide to be used in offering a four to six week "Lamaze" course for adopting couples.

Adopting after Infertility by Patricia Irwin Johnston (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1992). An extensive three part handbook for couples considering or pursuing adoption. Section one examines infertility and making all kinds of related decisions. Section two explores all of the issues to be decided in adoption--agency or independent, infant or older child, international or domestic, open or confidential-- and inlcudes guidance on choosing professionals and services which meet your needs. Section three explores life after adoption in a manner important for pre-adopters to explore: talking to kids, dealing with the world at large, infertility revisited, etc. This book replaces by updating and vastly expanding the material in Johnston's earlier well regarded An Adoptor's Advocate (Perspectives Press, 1984) which is now out of print. This comprehensive decision-making guide also fits in each of the resource categories which follow, but will not be listed there.

Launching a Baby's Adoption by Patricia Irwin Johnston (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1997.) A guide to what to expect when you're expecting and what to expect in the first year for families adopting a baby who arrives under at under a year of age.

How to Make Adoption an Affordable Option by the National Endowment for Financial Education (1998) available on their web site at http://www.nefe.org

The Adoption Life Cycle: The Children and their Families through the Years by Elinor B Rosenberg (New York: Free Press, 1992). A highly readable look at what clinical observations and academic research tell us about how the members of the adoption circle--birthparents, adoptive parents, adoptees--deal with, react to, and resolve adoption issues throughout their lives, from the period leading to decisionmaking through life's end.

Adoption and the Jewish Family: Contemporary Perspecitves by Shelly Rosenberg (Jewish Publication Society, 1998)

You're Our Child: The Adoption Experience by Jerome Smith and Franklin I. Miroff (Lanham, MD: Madison Books, rev 1987). An introduction to the idea of building a sense of entitlement between parents and children.

To Love a Child: A Complete Guide to Adoption, Foster Parenting, and Other Ways to Share Your Life with Children by Marianne Takas and Edward Warner (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1992. A wonderful exploration of alternative ways to add children to one's own life and make a difference in theirs. The only title to realistically explore fostering, big brothering and other non-permanent nurturing relationships as viable alternatives.

Books: What Type of Child?
Adopting and Advocating for the Special Needs Child by L Anne Babb and Rita Laws (Westport: Bergin and Garvey, 1997) a handbook for those considering special needs adoption.

Adoption and Financial Assistance: Tools for Navigating the Bureaucracy by Rita Laws and Tim O'Hanlon; (Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey, 1999) a detailed guide to navigating the maze of financial assistance legally available to adopters of special needs children.

Adoption and Disruption: Rates, Risks and Responses by Richard Barth and Marianne Berry (New York: Aldine De Gruyter, 1988). There is a great deal of mythology about what causes disruptions or failures in adoption. This book looks at the factors which contribute to an outcome of disruption and offers valuable suggestions for preventing them.

"Where Do Black Kids Belong? The Politics of Race Matching in Adoption" by Elizabeth Bartholet, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Vol. 139 No. 5, May, 1991, pp. 1163-1256 (order reprints from AFA.) A review of the results of the research which has examined transracial adoptions with a discussion of how politics has influenced the legal practice of adoption.

Gift Children: A Story of Race Family and Adoption in a Divided America by J. Douglas Bates (New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1993). The memoir of a family who adopted two pre-school aged bi-racial daughters in the early 1970s. This book is not a love-conquers-all our-story, but the honest revelations of a loving family as their children grew to adulthood in a middle class primarily white small city and beyond idealism to the realities of racism in America.

A Child's Journey through Placement by Vera I. Fahlberg, M.D. (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1991). Pediatrician and therapist Fahlberg helps both parents and professionals understand how the experience of being moved impacts on children. Provides a clear description of the attachment cycle and how to support attachment in children who have left important early caretakers.

Self Awareness, Self-Selection, and Success: A Parent Preparation Guidebook for Special Needs Adoption by Wilfred Hamm, T Morton and L Flynn (Washington: NACAC, 1985). A workbookish series of questionnaires and exercises for people considering special needs adoption. Order from AFA.

Toddler Adoption: The Weaver's Craft by Mary Hopkins-Best, Ed.D. (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1997.) A guide to making the decision to and then dealing with parenting issues unique to adopting a child older than infancy but younger than school age.

Adopting the Older Child by Claudia Jarratt (Boston: Harvard Common Press, 1978). Though older, this is a classic resource for those considering this option, written in a totally accessible style.

Helping Children Cope with Separation and Loss by Claudia Jewett (now Jarratt) (Boston: Harvard Common Press, 1994). Another valuable resource for those considering an older child.

Launching a Baby's Adoption by Patricia Irwin Johnston (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1997.) A guide to what to expect when you're expecting and what to expect in the first year for families adopting a baby who arrives under at under a year of age.

Adopting the Hurt Child: Hope for Families with Special-Needs Kids by Gregory Keck and Regina Kupecky (Colorado Springs, CO: Pinon Press, 1995) is an introduction to many of the strained attachment and other psychological issues that face children who have experienced multiple caretakers and their new families.

A Passage to the Heart: WRitings from Families with Children from China, edited by Amy Klatzkin (St Paul: Yeong & Yeong Book Co, 1999)

Forever Parents: Adopting Older Children by James E Kloeppel and Darlene A Kloeppel (Union City, GA: Adele Enterprises, 1995.) A family who have adopted two sibling groups of school aged children discuss adjustment issues.

Don't Touch My Heart:Healing the Pain of the Unattached Child by Lynda Gianforte Mansfield and Christopher H. Waldmann (Colorado Springs, CO: Pinon Press, 1994.) A fictionalized account of the symptoms and treatment of an unattached child

With Eyes Wide Open: A Workbook for Parents Adopting International Children over Age One by Margie Miller and Nancy Ward for the Children's Home Society of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN: LN Press, Inc., 1996.) This workbook can be particularly useful if used in the context of a parent preparation process.

Adoption Subsidy: A Guide for Adoptive Parents by Tim O'Hanlon, Ph.D. (Columbus, Ohio: New Roots, an Adoptive Families Support Group, 1995) A guidebook to the process of finding, getting, and keeping the financial assistance children with special needs are entitled to receive.

Transracial Adoption: Children and Parents Speak Out by ConstancePohl and Kathy Harris (New York: Franklin Watts, 1992) while not an in depth resource, offers the kind of helpful introductory overview of nearly all of the issues people ned to consider in order to make a good decision about whether or not to adopt outside their own ethnicity.

Are Those Kids Yours? American Families with Children Adopted from Other Countries by Cheri Register (New York: The Free Press, 1991). A thorough, practical, down to earth discussion about the realities of and guide to parenting a child born outside the U.S.

The Development of Romanian Orphanage Children Adopted to Canada: Final Report (Romanian Adoption Project, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1s6 Canada, 1999.).Report available at above address by sending $10. This gives an in-depth study of children's attachment and social adjustment post-adoption, and is relevant to other children previously institutionalized.

Inside Transracial Adoption by Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall (Perspectives Press, Inc. 2000) The directors of Pact: An Adoption Alliance, themselves transracial parents, share their insights to parenting children adopted across racial lines.

Secret Thoughts of An Adoptive Mother by Jana Wolff (Kansas City: Andrews & McNeel, 1997) Personal observations about the process of adopting in an open, transracial adoption.

Books/Videos: How-to Adopt
There Are Babies to Adopt by Christine Adamec (Boston: Mills and Sanderson, 1989). An exploration of various options in and routes to adopting an infant.

A Canadian Guide to International Adoptions by John Bowen (Toronto: Self Counsel Press, 1992).

The Adoption Resource Book by Lois Gilman (New York: HarperCollins, rev. 1998). This is the most authoritative adoption how-to available and has been updated several times. Journalist and adoptive parent Gilman carefully explores all types and styles of adoption and provides excellent resources for pursuing specific strategies.

The Whole Life Adoption Book by Jayne Schooler Colorado Springs: Pinon Press, 1993) is, as one reviewer has called it, a pre-adopt course on paper, introducing (though not covering thoroughly) multiple issues of importance.

Winning at Adoption by Sharon Kaplan (now Roszia) (Studio City, CA: The Family Network, 1991). A multimedia approach to making decisions about adoption style, this well put together package includes videotapes, audiotapes and workbooks.

Beating the Adoption Odds by Cynthia Martin (New York: Harcourt Brace, Jovanovich, 1998). A new edition of a classic how-to with valuable insights which will help you to weigh alternative styles.

The Private Adoption Handbook by Stanley B. Michelman and Meg Schneider (New York: Villard Books, 1989). A guide to independent adoption written by attorney specializing in the field.

CWLA's Guide to Adoption Agencies by Julia Posner (Washington: Child Welfare League of America, 1989) A comprehensive, but easily outdated state-by-state reference book.

Adopting Your Child: Options, Answers, Actions by Nancy Thalia Reynolds (Bellingham, WA: Self-Counsel Press, 1993). Guide to making decisions about types of adoption and to resources for facilitating adoptions by singles and couples, heterosexual and gay. Unique in that it includes, stategy building, step parent adoptions and extended family adoptions, is more specifically helpful to minority adopters than many how-tos, and covers material for Canadians as well as U.S. citizens.

Adopt the Baby You Want by Michael R. Sullivan and Susan Shultz. An attorney specializing in independent adoption shows you the ropes. This includes a good set of cautionary guidelines.

To Love a Child: A Complete Guide to Adoption, Foster Parenting, and Other Ways to Share Your Life with Children by Marianne Takas and Edward Warner (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1992.) A wonderful exploration of alternative ways to add children to one's own life and make a difference in theirs. The only title to realistically explore fostering, big brothering and other non-permanent nurturing relationships as viable alternatives.

How to Adopt a Child from Another Country by Eileen M Wirth and Joan Worden (Nashsville, TN: Abingdon Press, 1993). A how-to which, while up-to-date when new, will become quickly outdated and is severely impaired by its lack of both a resource section (no references to reading or to helpful organizations other than adoption agencies--lacking addresses) and an index!

Books: Openness in Adoption
Adoption: A Handful of Hope. by Suzanne Arms (Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts, 1990). A revised edition of the earlier To Love and Let Go, this book revisits, ten years later, several birthparents and adopting families who have chosen open adoption.

An Open Adoption by Lincoln Caplan (New York: Farrar, Strauss, Giraux, 1990). After extensive fascinating interviews with professionals on both sides of the controversy surrounding open adoption, journalist Caplan attempts to present objectively the intimate details of one particular open adoption in which both birth and adoptive parents allowed him to follow their progress from before the birth through a year following the placement, including a disturbing conclusion. The result is a book which is fascinating, and which neither pro-open or pro-confidential advocates find satisfying.

How to Open an Adoption: A Guide for Parents and Birthparents of Minors by Patricia Martinez Dorner (Royal Oak, MI: R-Squared Press, 1998.)

Openness in Adoption: Exploring Family Connections by H D Grotevant and Ruth G McRoy (Thousand Oaks: Sage, 1998) A report on the authors ongoing study of how families in open adoption are "doing."

Adoption without Fear edited by James. L. Gritter (San Antonio: Corona Publishing, 1989). A series of essays written by birth and adoptive parents who participated in open adoptions through the same Michigan agency.

The Spirit of Open Adoption by James L Gritter (Washington: CWLA, 1997)

Open Adoption: A Caring Option by Jean Warren Lindsay (Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 1987). Though more specifically written for pregnant teens, the audience to whom teen-parent educator Lindsay most often reaches out, this book offers interviews with nearly all of the well known professionals who have an opinion on the relatives merits of openness in adoption and as well offers prospective adopters insight into the thinking of prospective birthparents.

The Open Adoption Book: A Guide to Adoption Without Tears by Bruce Rappaport, Ph.D. (New York: MacMillan, 1992) The director of the Independent Adoption Center and founder of the National FEderation for Open Adoption Education's guide for consumers.

The Open Adoption Experience: A Complete Guide for Adoptive and Birth Families by Sharon Kaplan Roszia and Lois Melina (New York: HarperCollins, 1993). A practical guide to making decisions about openness adoption, living with openness over time, adapting to changing needs and relationships, this resource is unique in that it speaks to birth and adoptive families together.

A Letter to Adoptive Parents: on Open Adoption by Randolph W. Severson (Dallas, TX: House of Tomorrow Productions, 1991). A warm and encouraging booklet for families considering open adoption.

Dear Birthmother: Thank you for Our Baby by Kathleen Silber and Phylis Speedlin (San Antonio: Corona, 1982). This is the book that started the discussion of openness in adoption. Startlingly controversial when new, the form of open adoption it then promoted was the exchange of anonymous letters through an intermediary!

Children of Open Adoption by Kathleen Silber and Patricia Martinez Dorner (San Antonio: Corona, 1989). Nearly ten years after the practice began, Silber follows up on the growing children of some of the families with whom she began practicing openness in adoption.

Videos: Openness in Adoption
"Open Adoptions: The Experts Speak Out" from Children's Services Ctr in PAcific Grove, CA features interviews with and conversations between Carol Bishop, Barb Tremitiere, Kathleen Silber, Sharon Kaplan, Patricia Martinez Dorner, Annette Baran, Jeanne Etter, Jim Gritter, Joyce Maguire Pavao and Carol Biddle.

"Our Child" from Hope Adoption Service in Canada follows one set of birthparents and one set of adoptive parents in their decision to plan an open adoption with one another.

"Starting New Families: Open and Independent Adoption" from Visions Video

Books/Videos: Understanding and Enhancing Adoptive Family Relationships
Growing Up Adopted: A Portrait of Adolescents and Their Parents by Peter L. Benson, Ph.D, Anu Sharma Ph.D. and Eugene C. Roehlkepartain (Minneapolis: The Search Institute, 1994) A large and significantly more inclusive than usual study of children and families joined by adoption between 1975 and 1980, this study challenges many of the assumptions of earlier less representative studies composed of those in a mental health setting or uncontrolled self volunteers.

Cline/Helding Adopted and Foster Child Assessment. Foster Cline and Cathy Helding. (Wisconsin: World Enterprises. 1999.) This manual permits parents and professionals to score and consider simultaneous diagnoses or issues that can be affecting children.

The Psychology of Adoption edited by David M. Brodzinsky and Marshall Schechter. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990). A collection of essays on a variety of adoption issues--many written by trainers who have not written books and up to now have been difficult for consumers to access.

Being Adopted: The Lifelong Search for Self by David M. Brodzinsky and Marshall Schechter and Robin Marantz Henig. (New York: Doubleday, 1992). Integrating both psychological and educational theory, the authors offer a model of normal development in adoptees.

Can This Child Be Saved? Solutions for Adoptive and Foster Families by Foster W. Cline, M.D. and Cathy Helding; Franksville, WI: World Enterprises, 1999

A Child's Journey through Placement by Vera I. Fahlberg, M.D. (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1991). A careful look at how transfering a child from a known environment to any long term new placement--hospitalization, interim care, etc.--affects attachment, with specific suggestions for avoiding unnecessary oves and facilitating those which are unavoidable.

Residential Treatment: A Tapestry of Many Therapies by Vera I. Fahlberg, M.D. (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1990). An explanation of how the process of mileu therapy works with troubled children.

Our Child: Preparation for Parenting in Adoption--Instructor's Guide by Carol A. Hallenbeck. (Wayne, PA: Our Child Press, rev 1989). A fully scripted curriculum guide for offering a "Lamaze" course for prospective adopters.

Helping Children Cope with Separation and Loss by Claudia Jewett (Boston: Harvard Common Press, 1978). The classic consumer-directed look at how children experiences losses of all kinds--death, divorce, adoption, etc.

Launching a Baby's Adoption by Patricia Irwin Johnston (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1997.) A guide to what to expect when you're expecting and what to expect in the first year for families adopting a baby who arrives under at under a year of age.

Perspectives on a Grafted Tree: Thoughts for Those Touched by Adoption edited by Patricia Irwin Johnston (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1983). A collection of poems written by birthparents, adoptive parents, adoptees, and professionals in the field in an effort to demonstrate the gain and loss, happiness and pain that are part of the adoption experience for all involved.

Shared Fate: A Theory and Method of Adoptive Relationships by H. David Kirk (Brentwood Bay, BC: Ben Simon Publications, rev. 1984). See discussion in Chapter Four.

Exploring Adoptive Family Life: The Collected Papers of H.D.K. by H. David Kirk (Brentwood Bay, BC: Ben Simon Publications, 1988)

The Adoption Life Cycle: The Children and their Families through the Years by Elinor B. Rosenberg (New York: The Free Press, 1992). Psychiatry professor and adoptive parent Rosenberg presents a view of the challenges of successfully integrating adoption and the changes it continuously brings into the lives of those whom it touches--adoptees, birthparents, adoptive parents.

You're Our Child: The Adoption Experience by Jerome Smith and Franklin Miroff (Lanham, MD: Madison Books, rev 1987). See discussion in Chapter Four.

Holding Time by Martha G. Welch (New York: Simon & Shuster, 1989) An aid for parents dealing with attachment problems.

"When the Bough Breaks" PBS Frontline documentary on infant attachment issues, 1995

Helping Children Learn
Not in Front of the Children... How to Talk to Your Child About Tough Family Matters by Lawrence Balter, Ph.D. and Peggy Jo Donahue (New York: Viking, 1993). A child psychologist and well known advice columnist talks to parents about how young children (from toddlers through early school-aged) learn and how they perceive difficult issues and "family secrets." Infertility and its alternatives are not addressed specifically, but general guidance provided here can be valuable.

Growing Up Adopted: A Portrait of Adolescents and Their Parents by Peter L. Benson, Ph.D, Anu Sharma Ph.D. and Eugene C. Roehlkepartain (Minneapolis: The Search Institute, 1994) A large and significantly more inclusive than usual study of children and families joined by adoption between 1975 and 1980, this study challenges many of the assumptions of earlier less representative studies composed of those in a mental health setting or uncontrolled self volunteers.

The Flight of the Stork by Anne C. Bernstein (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1994). How children learn about and come to understand sexuality and reproduction, including chapters on adoption, ARTS and collaborative reproduction.

The Long Awaited Stork: A Guide to Parenting after Infertility by Ellen Sarasohn Glazer (Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1990). One writer's view of how infertility issues may rise again for couples who pursue quasi or tradition adoption or give birth after struggling with infertility.

Raising the Rainbow Generation: Teaching Children to Be Successful in a Multicultural Society by Darlene Pwell Hopson and Derek S Hopson with Thomas Clavin (New York: Fireside, 1993.) The authors examine the sources of racial and ethnic stereotypes and explore tha attitudes of parents before dispensing advice about raising culturally sensitive children.

Communicating with the Adopted Child by Miriam Komar (New York: Walker Publishing Co., 1991). Advice on how to talk with kids about adoption.

Making Sense of Adoption: A Parents Guide by Lois Ruskai Melina (New York: Harper & Row, 1989). Advice on how to talk with kids about adoption.

Raising Adopted Children: A Manual for Adoptive Parents by Lois Ruskai Melina (New York: Harper & Row, 1998). A somewhat "Dr. Spockish", encylopedic handbook on adoption issues.

Adoption in the Schools Project: Volume I (A Manual for Parents) and Volume 2 (A Guide for Educators) by Nancy Sheehan Ng and Lansing Wood. This wonderfully put together two volume manual was put together by two long-time adoption activists from the exceptional parent group, FAIR, (with financial support from NACAC and a U.S. Children's Bureau grant) and was designed to help parents help teachers explore both the impact of adoption on the children they teach and their own influence on the way the child who was adopted experiences school. It includes exercises, lesson plans, essays, bibliographies, etc. Each manual is $30 (with shipping) and is available from FAIR, PO Box 51436, Palo Alto CA 94303.

Your Baby's Mind and How it Grows: Piaget's Theory for Parents. by Maryann Spencer Pulaski(New York: Harper & Row, 1978). Developmental psychology of children

How to Raise an Adopted Child by Judith Schaffer and Christine Lindstrom (New York: Crown, 1989). Advice on how to deal with ongoing adoption issues and how to talk with kids about adoption.

Telling the Truth to Your Adopted or Foster Child: Making Sense of the Past by Betsy Keefer and Jayne E. Schooler (Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey, 2000) 256 pages. ISBN 0-89789-691-2, paperback, $17.95

A Mighty Time: Talking to Your Adopted Adolescent about Sex by Randolph W. Severson (Dallas: House of Tomorrow Productions, undated). A helpful little booklet for parents dealing with "the hormone years" which does a good job of helping top identify what's "normal" and what's "adoption."

Parenting Your Adopted Child: A Complete and Loving Guide by Stephanie E. Siegel (New York: Prentice Hall Press, 1989). Advice on how to deal with ongoing adoption issues and how to talk with kids about adoption.

Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the adopted Child by Holly Van Gulden and Lisa M Bartels-Rabb (New York: Crossroad, 1993). Advice for parents and professionals about understanding how childrren perceive adoptions and on talking with children about their adoptions.

Talking with Young Children about Adoption by Mary Watkins and Susan Fisher, M.D. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993) Contains revealing conversations between parents and their children aged 2 to 10 from families of all kinds. These adoptive parents (a psychologist and a psychoanalyst) stress that adoptive families integrate diversity in preparing parents to speak frankly with their children.

Books for Caring Others
When Friends Ask about Adoption: Question and Answer Guide for Non-Adoptive Parents and Other Caring Adults by Linda Bothun (Chevy Chase, MD: Swan Publications, 1987). A booklet designed to be given to those whose lives may touch our families. (Order from AFA)

Adoption in the Schools Project by Nancy Sheehan Ng and Lansing Wood. This wonderfully put together manual was put together by two long-time adoption activists from the exceptional parent group, FAIR, and was designed to help parents help teachers explore both the impact of adoption on the children they teach and their own influence on the way the child who was adopted experiences school. It includes exercises, lesson plans, essays, bibliographies, etc. $30 (with shipping) and is available from FAIR, PO Box 51436, Palo Alto CA 94303.

Supporting an Adoption by Patricia Holmes (Wayne, PA: Our Child Press, 1984). A booklet for families, teachers, clergy, doctors, and others who may come in contact with adoption-built families. (Order from publisher at PO Box 74, Wayne, PA 19087 for $6.00 postpaid.)

Adoption Is a Family Affair! What Relatives and Friends Must Know (Indianapolis, IN: Perspectives Press, Inc., 2001) A book designed to introduce families and friends and others to adoption's realities and to dispel its myths.

Adoption Awareness: A Guide for Teachers, Counselors, Nurses and Caring Others by Jeanne Warren Lindsay and Catherine Monserrat (Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 1989). A complete, careful and supportive discussion of numerous issues related to adoption as an positive option for people dealing with an untimely pregnancy.

National/International Circulation Magazines and Newsletters for Parents and Clinical Professionals
Because subscription rates are subject to change, I have not provided current rates. Please write for current information, and consider enclosing a stamped, self addressed envelope for a response.

Adoptive Families is the world's largest circulation, most detailed and inclusive magazine on adoptive parenting issues. In, January, 2000, it was sold by the not-for-profit Adoptive Families of America to a for-profit publisher, New Hope Communications LLC, 2472 Broadway, New York, New York 10024. To subscribe: Phone 1-800-372-3300 Fax: 1-212-877-9198, email Info@adoptivefam.org

Adoptalk is the newsletter of North American Council on Adoptable Children (address above).

Adopted Child successfully written and published by journalist/author/trainer and adoptive parent Lois Melina was folded into Adoptive Families magazine in 2001

Adoption Helper is a quarterly Canadian newsletter offering practical assistance for Canadians seeking a placement. (189 Springdale Blvd., Toronto, Ont. M4C 1Z6 CANADA).

Adoption Medical News is an online subscription-only newsletter which publishes information on specific medical needs of internationally adopted children. (Pierce Group International, 2001 S Street NW Ste 302, Washington DC 20009
Phone 202 299-0053, www.adoptionmedical news.com)

Adoption Today is a bi-monthly magazine once called Chosen Child. Subscriptions are $ 21.00 annually through Louis & Co Publisdhing, 4221 A Eisenhower, Ste 3, Loveland, CO 80537 or on the web site at http://www.chosenchild.com

Fostering Families Today (www.fosteringfamiliestoday.com) is a quarterly magazine also published by Louis & Co, publishers, as well, of Adoption Today. Edited by Cynthia Peck, former editor and publisher of Roots and Wings, this is packed with sound and well-written articles and graphically attractive as well. It is also helpful for later-placed adopted children.

Hoofbeats is a newsletter published by Attachment Disorder Network, 14621 W 84trh St, Shawnee Mission, KS 66215
913 888-5844, www.radzebra.org

Jewel Among Jewels is a Christian-focused quarterly offering "a safe place for expressing the emotional and relational issues of unresolved adoption loss, to celebrate the blessings of adoption and to empower adoptees by reminding of their God-given worth." (Jewel Among Jewesl, East 91st Street Christian Church, 9302 Seascape Dr., Indpls, IN 46256.

National Adoption Reports is the quarterly newsletter of National Council for Adoption. (address above).

Pact Press is a sporadically published newsletter dealing with issues of openness and adopting children of color. Published by Pact--An Adoption Alliance, which is also an adoption facilitator. (PACT, 3220 Blume Dr, Ste 289, Richmond, CA 94806)

The Roundtable from National Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption at Spaulding for Children offers special focus information targeted primarily for professionals in the field. (NRCSN, 17390 W Eight Mile Rd., Southfield, MI 48075).

Roots & Wings for many years published by adoptive parent Cynthia Peck was folded into Adoption Today in 2001.

Many local and regional adoption support groups publish excellent newsletters, such as FACE Facts from Families Adopting Children from Everywhere in Maryland, News from FAIR from Families Adopting in Response in California and many more!

Finding Books for Children
Adoption Literature for Children and Young Adults: An Annotated Bibliography by Susan G. Miles (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1991). An extensive bibliography of children's books with an adoption focus designed to be used by caring adults in selecting appropriate materials.

The best source for an up-to-date list of the best in children's books on adoption and culturally sensitive materials for families adopting across racial or national lines is Adoptive Families of America's Parent Resources catalog.

Other adoption-focused mail-order book resources include Our Child Press (PO Box 74, Wayne PA 19087), Tapesty Books (P.O. Box 359, Ringoes NJ 08551)

Also be certain that you are on the mailing list of Perspectives Press, the infertility and adoption publisher, P.O. Box 90318, Indianapolis, IN 46290.

Adoption: The Family Of Origin And Birth
American Adoption Congress (P.O. Box 44040, L'Enfant Plaza Station, Washington D.C. 20026) is a national umbrella organization for the myriad of small local organizations nationwide which offer support to searching birthparents and adult adoptees and which actively lobby for change in the adoption system.

Bastard Nation

Concerned United Birthparents (2000 Walker St, Des Moines, IA 50317) is a national support and advocacy organization for birthparents who have found adoption to be a negative force in their lives. Their newsletter CUB Reporter and a variety of fact sheets on issues of coping and search present a view which can be highly informative for professionals and for some adoptive parents, but many less well read adopters will find this material difficult and painful.

The Psychology of Adoption edited by David M.Brodzinsky and Marshall Schechter (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990). (see above)

Being Adopted: The Lifelong Search for Self by David M.Brodzinsky and Marshall Schechter (New York: Doubleday, 1992). (see above)

I Wish for You a Beautiful Life: Letters from the Korean Birth Mothers of Ae Ran Won to Their Children, edited by Sara Dorow (St Paul: Yeong & Yeong Book Co, 1998) a poignant anthology of letters from Korean birthparents.

Shattered Dreams--Lonely Choices: Birthparents of Babies with Disabilities Talk about Adoption by Joanne Finnegan (Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey, 1993). This unique resource of guidance and support for birthfamilies who find themselves needing to consider alternatives (parenting, abortion, adoption) for a baby born with disabilities they feel unprepared to deal with shares the stories of several couples. Offers clear guidance for medical and mental health professionals serving such couples and will help prospective adoptive parents understand the dilemmas of such birthparents.

Reunion: A Year in Letters Between a Birmother and the Daughter She Couldn't Keep by Katie Hern and Ellen McGarry Carolson (Seattle, WA: Seal Press, 1999.) Katie Hern, adopted at birth as the youngest of three adopted children, thought for much of her life that, for her, adoption was simply "no big deal." When she decided, at age 27, to search for her birthmother, she felt is was for "medical information." Thus began a correspondence between these two women living on opposite coasts. Midway through the year of letters and emails the two met face-to-face, triggering deep fears in Katie's parent, confusion and ambivalence for Katie, hurt for Ellen. They needed to develop a new equilibrium. This year in letters is a fascinating look at the development of a reunion relationship.

Perspectives on a Grafted Tree: Thoughts for Those Touched by Adoption edited by Patricia Irwin Johnston (Indianapolis: Perspectives Press, 1983). (see above)

Birthmothers: Women Who Have Relinquished Babies for Adoption Tell Their Stories by Merry Bloch Jones (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 1993) A carefully explored collection of interviews with birthmothers, this book looks for commonalities of experience and is honest without being angry or hopeless.

Lost and Found: The Adoption Experience by Betty Jean Lifton (New York: Harper & Row, rev 1988). An adult adoptee describes the impact of her confidential adoption on the formation of her identity.

Out of the Shadows: Birthfathers' Stories by Mary Martin Mason. (Edina, MN: O.J. Howard Publishing, 1995) A collection of stories about the experiences of birthfathers.

An Adopted Woman by Katrina Maxtone-Graham (New York: Remi Books, 1983). A fascinating look at one woman's search for her family of origin.

The Family of Adoption by Joyce Maguire Pavao (Boston: Beacon Press, 1998) Dr. Maguire Pavao, a well known therapist and trainer and herself and adoptee offers her insgiths into the impact of adoption and its losses on the adoptee and his two sets of parents.

The Open Adoption Pocket Guide Book Series, Royal Oak, MI: R-Squared Press, 1999. A four booklet series, contains these individual elements: Your Rights and Responsibilities: A Guide for Expectant Parents Exploring Adoption by Brenda Romanchik. 21 page booklet. ISBN 0-9641035-0-8, $5.95. Birthparent Grief by Brenda Romanchik. 17 page booklet, ISBN 0-9641035-6-7, $5.95. Being a Birthparent: Finding Our Place by Brenda Romanchik. 17 page booklet, ISBN 0-9641035-9-1, $5.95. What Is Open Adoption? by Brenda Romanchik. 19 page booklet, ISBN 0-9641035-4-0, $5.95.

The Dark Side of Adoption by Marsha Riben (Detroit: Harlo, 1988). A scathing indictment of adoption by a birthparent activist who believes that adoption nearly always represents unnecessary family separation.

Searching for a Past: The Adopted Adult's Unique Process of Finding Identity by Jayne Schooler (Colorado Springs, CO: 1995: Pinon Press) How and why adoptees look at the process of searching for their birthfamilies, how they process these experiences, and the impact of search on themselves and their relationships.

Dear Birthfather by Randolph W. Severson, Ph.D. (Dallas: House of Tomorrow Productions, 1991). A warm and loving booklet.

The Adoption Life Cycle: The Children and their Families through the Years by Elinor B Rosenberg (New York: Free Press, 1992). (see above)

The Adoption Triangle: The Effects of the Sealed Record on Adoptees, Birth Parents and Adoptive Parents by Arthur D.Sorosky, Annette Baran and Reuben Pannor (San Antonio: Corona Publishers, rev 1990). A classic report calling for a revolutionary change to totally open adoption prepared by three long term adoption professionals.

Giving Away Simone by Jan Waldron (New York: Times Books, 1995) The beuatifully written, tortured account of a birtmother's attempts to resolve grief, shame and self-loAthing she associated with being a birthparent to a biracial daughter in an identified but for many years non-communicative adoption, Waldron's book explores the struggle of birthmother and adolescent daughter to figure out their relationship with one another.

Credits: Patricia Irwin Johnston, MS

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