image

image

 
JOIN 800,000+ MEMBERS JOINJOIN Cancel
image

Developmental Characteristics of Young Children

print
bookmark
comment
  • Currently 3/5 Stars.
You may use the stars on the left to rate and leave feedback for the current article. No registration is required. Waiting for 5 votes 3.0 of 5 stars (1 votes) — Thanks for your vote

Please fill out the following optional information before submitting your rating:



This portion of the CT Parents Plus web site will soon contain developmental information on children from birth to age three, presented in five sections. Basic information will be taken from the Brilliant Beginnings materials and then elaborated on by our Director of Education. We will also be listing web sites (including Brilliant Beginnings' own site), books and videos on each age group.

Brilliant Beginnings, LLC has developed products and resources for parents to guide them in nurturing their children's intellectual development during the first five years of life. A team of leading experts in neuroscience, child development and early childhood education have translated recent child development and neuroscientific research into meaningful, actionable steps for parents and caregivers.

"Scientists have been telling us the foundation for lifetime learning occurs during the first years of life, helping to determine how a person will learn, think, develop emotionally and reason all through their lives. They tell us brain pathways are created and reinforced by exposing young children to a 'rich, stimulating environment' but they don't tell parents what this means or what they should do," says Kathleen Healy, President of Brilliant Beginnings.

This column will appear each month with information about a parenting or child development issue that has been asked of us by a parent or a home visitor or is currently being discussed in the media. It is intended to give parents and other caregivers research-based data so that they can find their own way to parent their particular child in a manner that respects the individuality of the child and fulfills the need for consistency on the part of the parent. The information in this column will come from recent research being done by noted experts in their field. If there is more than one substantiated point of view then both sides will be reported on here. You will also receive information from experienced parent educators who can back up this research by what they have seen occur in the homes of young children.
Visitor Comments (0) - Be the first to comment
Adding your comments contributes to the adoption community. Please keep all comments on topic and civil. Visitors are invited to comment and vote for or flag comments based on appropriateness and helpfulness. All comments must adhere to our commenting rules and are subject to moderation.
Settings Help Feedback
Template Settings
Width: 1024     1280
Choose a Location:
Choose a Theme: